INTERNATIONAL OIL SPILL CONFERENCE

spill international

San Antonio, Texas The eighth biennial Oil Spill Conference — sponsored jointly by the U.S. petroleum industry and the federal government — will be held February 28 - March 3, 1983, at the San Antonio Convention Center, San Antonio, Texas.

More than 1,500 delegates and exhibitors from all over the world are expected to attend. More than 100 technical papers dealing with the prevention, behavior, control, and cleanup of oil spills will be presented. A number of films will also be shown.

The conference will stress prevention and control techniques; cleanup operations; contingency planning; new equipment development; environmental mapping; offshore operations; computer modeling; and socio-economiclegal aspects.

Poster presentations will add a new dimension to the conference. A Texas spill mapping project, aerial photo surveys of Alaska, and oil spill techniques in Australia are topics featured in the highly-visible poster program. Sponsors of the international conference are the American Petroleum Institute, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Coast Guard.

Papers at the conference will be delivered by representatives from 18 countries including Australia, Bahrain, Bermuda, Canada, France, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, Norway, Panama, Sweden, Saudi Arabia, United Kingdom, the U.S., USSR, Venezuela, and West Germany.

One of the papers "Activities of the USSR Ministry of Merchant Marine Organizations in the field of Marine Environment Protection," by S.M. Nunuparov, to be presented by Oleg N. Khalimonov, will mark the first time the USSR has presented a paper at this conference, informed sources reported. The Soviet Government has had representatives at prior conferences, it was noted, Two special luncheons are planned. On Tuesday, March 1, at noon in the North Banquet Hall, Adm. James S. Gracey, Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard, will deliver an address. On Thursday, March 3, James H. Gillie, assistant to the vice president of public affairs of Phillips 66, will entertain the luncheon guests with an address entitled "Right On Instead of Rip Off." This luncheon also will begin at noon in the North Banquet Hall.

The film festival will highlight important technical aspects of the industry. The films will be shown on a scheduled basis in Room No. 25 of the convention center. A brochure listing titles, viewing times, and loan sources will be among the information packets distributed at the conference. Speaker's breakfasts will be held on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday mornings at 7:00 a.m. in Room No. 31 at the convention center. The conference committee has requested chairmen, speakers, and panel members attend the breakfasts on the day they are speaking or are chairing a session.

The organizers also have arranged for a speakers' practice room, Room No. 12, to be available. The room will be equipped with a slide projector, screen, and electric pointer, and the room will be available on an unreserved basis.

A copy of the Conference Proceedings is included with full registration and will be available onsite. Additional copies ordered in advance also will be available onsite at a pre-publication price of $40. Following the conference, the 1983 Conference Proceedings may be ordered from the American Petroleum Institute, Washington, D.C.

A Hospitality Suite for Spouses and children will be available from 8:00 to 10:00 a.m. from March 1 to March 3 in Room No. 33 at the center. Hostesses familiar with San Antonio will be on hand to offer guidance on tours and other local attractions. A tour program has been planned with arrangements being made for three tours that include places such as El Mercado, the Institute of Texan Cultures, the Spanish Governor's Palace, the Lone Star Brewery, Mission San Jose, the Alamo, the Southwest Craft Center, and the King William restoration area. The 1983 Oil Spill Conference general committee is under the chairmanship of Richard K. Meyers of Texaco Inc. and co-chairmen Capt. Charles R. Corbett, USCG, and Ronald D. Hill, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Committee members include Comdr. Frank A. Boersma, USCG, Kent G. Drummond, Marathon Oil Company, John S. Farlow, EPA, Richard W. Kreutsen, Chevron U.S.A., Royal J. Nadeau, EPA, and Charles W. Sieber, USCG. The program committee is chaired by Comdr. Roger T. Rufe Jr., USCG, with William R. Leek of Chevron USA and Royal J. Nadeau of the EPA serving as vice chairmen.

The registration fee for the conference is $200 and includes all technical sessions, two luncheons, and a copy of the proceedings. Additional information on the conference can be received from: 1983 Oil Spill Conference, Suite 700, 1629 K Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20006. Tel.

(202) 296-7262.

1983 OIL SPILL CONFERENCE Final Program Tuesday, March 1 8:30 a.m. Theatre Plenary Session Henry Cisneros, Mayor, City of San Ant o n io Rear Admiral Bobby F. Hollingsworth, Chief, Office of Marine Environment and Systems, United States Coast Guard Dick Whittington, P.E., Regional Administrator, Region VI, United States Environmental Protection Agency Richard K. Meyers, 1983 Oil Spill Conference Chairman, American Petroleum Institute (Texaco Inc.) 9:45 a.m. River Room Session 1: International Contingency Planning (A Panel Discussion) Chairman: Captain Charles R. Corbett, U.S. Coast Guard, Washington, D.C. Vice Chairmen: William L. Berry, Shell Offshore, Inc., New Orleans, Louisiana Eleanor Swett, Offshore Devices, Inc., Peabody, Massachusetts Panel Members: Yoshio Sasamura, International Maritime Organization, London, England Captain Jose Orozco Peralta, Mexican Navy, Mexico City, Mexico David E.A. Barratt, Canadian Coast Guard, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Chris Carven, Exxon Corporation, New York, New York 9:45 a.m. Mission Room A Session 2: Underground Spills Chairman: Thomas Massey, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Vice Chairman: Millard F. Smith, Slickbar, Inc., Southport, Connecticut Case History — OPEC in Southern Idaho James C. Willmann, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Seattle, Washington Case History — Underground Oil Spill Investigation and Cleanup David Mclntyre, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Lexington, Massachusetts A Case History: Cleanup of a Subsurface Leak of Refined Product Edward M. Minugh, Environmental Emergency Services Company, Portland, Oregon; Dorothy A. Keech, Chevron Oil Field Research Company, La Habra, California; Jeffrey J. Patry, Chevron U.S.A., Inc., Concord, California; William R. Leek, Chevron U.S.A., Inc., San Francisco, California 9:45 a.m. Mission Room B Session 3: Dispersants I Chairman: Gerard P. Canevari, Exxon Research and Engineering Company, Florham Park, New Jersey Vice Chairman: Leo T. McCarthy, Jr., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, New Jersey Dispersant Use Guidelines for Federal Regions IX and X Randall W. Smith, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Sacramento, California; Robert Pavia, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Seattle, Washington Dispersion of Chemically Treated Crude Oil in Norwegian Offshore Waters Rainer G. Lichtenthaler and Per S. Daling, Central Institute for Industrial Research, Oslo, Norway Review of United Kingdom Oil Spill Response Techniques and Equipment Douglas Cormack, Department of Trade, London, England 10:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m. North Exhibit Hall Poster Session A Chairman: John S. Farlow, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, New Jersey Vice Chairman: E.D. Parker, Marathon Oil Company, Houston, Texas 10:00 a.m.-10:45 a.m. Use of Dracone Barges: A Case History February 15, 1983 Peter A. Brunk, Industrial Marine Service, Inc., Norfolk, Virginia 10:45 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Transfer and Storage Systems for the Alaskan Beaufort Sea Paul C. Deslauriers, Marine Consultants, Anchorage, Alaska 1:30 p.m.-2:15 p.m. A Field Testing and Assessment of Oil Dispersant Efficiency J.P. Desmarquest, J. Croquette and F. Merlin, CEDRE,, Brest, France; C. Bocard and C. Gatellier, Institut Francais du Petrole, France 1:30 p.m.-2:15 p.m. Underground Gasoline Spill Recovery: A Blending of Science and Engineering Robert W. Castle, Carl F. Foget and Martin A. Cramer, Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Walnut Creek, California 2:15 p.m.-3:00 p.m. The Development of a Dispersant Applicator for Cleaning Oiled Sediments James Glasgow and Douglass Gleason, Maine Department of Environmental Protection, Portland, Maine 3:00 p.m.-3:45 p.m. Emulsions and Debris Tests at OHMSETT Anibal Diaz, Mason and Hanger-Silas Mason Company, Inc., Leonardo, New Jersey 3:45 p.m.-4:30 p.m. In Situ Sampling for Trace Hydrocarbons David R. Green and Blair Humphrey, Seakem Oceanography Ltd., Sidney, British Columbia, Canada 3:45 p.m.-4:30 p.m. EPA/API Standard Reference Oil Program Leo T. McCarthy, Jr., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, New Jersey and J.R. Gould, American Petroleum Institute, Washington, D.C. 12:00 noon North Banquet Hall LUNCHEON Admiral James S. Gracey, Commandant United States Coast Guard 1:30 p.m. River Room Session 4: Contingency Planning 1 Chairman: Captain Gerald J. Hinson, U.S. Coast Guard, Corpus Christi, Texas Vice Chairman: Pat O'Brien, Chevron U.S.A., San Francisco, California Oil Spill Contingency Planning for Georges Bank Elmer P. Danenberger, U.S. Department of the Interior, Hyannis, Massachusetts; Captain R. Barry Eldridge, U.S. Coast Guard, Boston, Massachusetts; Marshall Crocker, Halliburton Services, Duncan, Oklahoma Probability of an Oil Spill on the St. Marys River Robert H. Schulze, ARCTEC, Inc., Columbia, Maryland New Directions in Navy Spill Contingency Planning Paul J. Yaroschak, U.S. Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Alexandria, Virginia An Environmental Impact Study and Pollution Contingency Plan for an Ecologically Sensitive Area in the North Sea T.G. Wilkinson and R. McEwan, Shell, U.K. Exploration and Production, Aberdeen, Scotland The Venezuelan National Oil Spill Contingency Plan Ian Achong, Petroleos de Venezuela, Caracas, Venezuela; John Bennett, Bennett Environmental Consultants, West Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Chris Hatfield, Hatfield Consultants Ltd., West Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Noel Boston, IEC/BEAK Consultants, Ltd., Richmond, British Columbia, Canada Oil Spill Contingency Planning and Scientific Support Coordination in Bermuda: A Successful Model Thomas D. Sleeter and Anthony H. Knap, Bermuda Biological Station for Research, Inc., Bermuda; I. Walwyn Hughes, Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Bermuda A $1 Million Spill Drill and Two Tons of Oranges Stephen Kaufmann, Sunshine Chemical Corporation, West Hartford, Connecticut; Sal G. Brancato, United Illuminating Company, New Haven, Connecticut; Frank Maitland, New Haven Terminal, New Haven, Connecticut; Richard Martin, Gulf Oil Corporation, New Haven, Connecticut 1:30 p.m. Mission Room A Session 5: Coastal Zone Impacts Chairman: Commander Frank A. Boersma, U.S. Coast Guard, Washington, D.C.

Vice Chairman: J.T. Leigh, Texaco Inc., Beacon, New York Long Term Investigations on Chemical and Microbial Changes of a Slightly Oil Polluted Beach Gunter Gassmann and Wilfried Gunkel, Biologische Anstalt Helgoland, Federal Republic of Germany Sandy Beach Communities Exposed to Natural Oil Seepage Dale Straughan, Paramount, California Potential Damage of Oil Wastes in Coastal Estuary Sediments Thomas F. Lytle and Julia S. Lytle, Gulf Coast Research Laboratory, Ocean Springs, Mississippi Geomorphological Impact of Cleanup of an Oiled Salt Marsh (lie Grande, France) B.F. Long, University of Quebec, Rimouski, Quebec, Canada and J.H. Vandermeulen, Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada A Natural Resources Damage Assessment Study: The IXTOC I Blowout Paul D. Boehm and David L. Fiest, Energy Resources Company, Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts; Ian Kaplan and Paul Mankiewicz, Global Geochemistry Corporation, Canoga Park, California; George S. Lewbel, LGL Ecological Research, Inc., Bryan, Texas A Spill of Light Fuel Oil in the Baltic Sea Olof Linden, Jan Mattsson and Mats Notini, Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Karlskrona, Sweden 1:30 p.m. Mission Room B Session 6: Input/Computer Modeling Chairman: David E. Thornton, Environment Canada, Quebec, Ontario, Canada Vice Chairman: Gerd Kleineberg, U.S. Coast Guard, Groton, Connecticut Study of Wind and Current Datasets for IXTOC Oil Spill Hindcast Eric L. Anderson, Applied Science Associates, Inc., Wakefield, Rhode Island First Experiences with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Oil Spill Model Harilaos N. Psaraftis and J.D. Nyhart, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts; David A. Betts, Petro-Canada, Calgary, Alberta, Canada The Use of Receptor Mode Trajectory Analysis Techniques for Contingency Planning J.A. Gait and D.L. Payton, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Seattle, Washington A Review of the State-of-the-Art of Oil Spill Fate/Behavior Models James C. Huang, Raytheon Company, Portsmouth, Rhode Island Analyzing the Potential Effects of Operational Discharges of Oil from Ships in the Gulf of Mexico Charles N. Ehler, Daniel J. Basta and Thomas F. LaPointe, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Washington, D.C.

Testing of Crude Oils and Petroleum Products for Environmental Purposes Donald Mackay and Warren Stiver, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Lt. Commander Peter A. Tebeau, U.S. Coast Guard, Washington, D.C. Wednesday, March 2 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. North Exhibit Hall Poster Session B Chairman: John S. Farlow, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, New Jersey Vice Chairman: Harold J. Pecunia, Peterson Maritime Services, Inc., New Orleans, Louisiana 9:00 a.m.-9:45 a.m. Assessing the Impacts of Oil Spills on Georges Bank Fisheries Mark Reed, Applied Science Associates, Inc., Wakefield, Rhode Island; Malcolm L. Spaulding and Saul B. Salia, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, Rhode Island 9:45 a.m.-10:30 a.m. Oil Spill Model for Port and Harbor Contingency Planning Joseph O'Neill and Raymond Sosnowski, Normandeau Associates, Inc., Bedford, New Hampshire 10:30 a.m.-11:15 a.m. Computer Prediction and Mapping of Oil Spills in Australia Terry R. McKay, Department of Home Affairs and Environment, Canberra City, Australia; Jerry A. Gait, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Seattle, Washington 11:15 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Oil Residence and Oil Spill Biological Sensitivity Indices for Coastal Marine Environments Gordon A. Robilliard, Edward H. Owens and John Harper, Woodward- Clyde Consultants, Walnut Creek, California; Ted P. Winfield, Woodward- Clyde Consultants, San Diego, California 2:00 p.m.-2:45 p.m. Logistics — An Underdeveloped Link for Offshore Incidents Lt. Commander J.L. O'Brien and DCC D.A. Jago, U.S. Coast Guard, Hamilton Air Force Base, California 2:00 p.m.-2:45 p.m. Aerial Photographic Surveys Analyzed to Deduce Oil Spill Movement During the Decay and Break-up of Fast Ice, Prudhoe Bay, Alaska Ivan M. Lissauer and Denise A. Baird, U.S. Coast Guard Research and Development Center, Groton, Connecticut 2:45 p.m.-3:30 p.m. Development of Advanced Oil Spill Dispersant Application System for Fokker F27 Aircraft Bruce D. Emery, Conair Aviation, Ltd., Abbotsford, British Columbia, Canada and John Cuddeback, Arabian American Oil Company, Saudi Arabia 3:30 p.m.-4:15 p.m. State of Texas Spill Response Mapping Project David Barker and the Spill Response Unit Staff, Texas Department of Water Resources, Austin, Texas 3:30 p.m.-4:15 p.m. Flight Tests of a Self Contained Dispersant Spray System for Cargo Aircraft Gordon P. Lindblom, Exxon Chemical Company, Houston, Texas; Stewart A. Horn, Mobil Oil Corporation, New York, New York; James C. Jeffries, Biegert Aviaton, Inc., Chandler, Arizona; Jerry O'Neal, Environmental Greenery, Inc., Biloxi, Mississippi 4:15 p.m.-5:00 p.m. MIRG Environmental Element: An Oil Spill Response Tool for the Gulf of Mexico Bart J. Baca and Charles D. Getter, Research Planning Institute, Inc., Columbia, South Carolina; June Lindstedt- Siva, Atlantic Richfield Company, Los Angeles, Calfornia 9:00 a.m. River Room Session 7: Equipment I Chairman: Commander Donald Jensen, U.S. Coast Guard, Portsmouth, Virginia Vice Chairman: William C. Park, Mobil Oil Corporation, New York, New York On Some Activities in Preventing Sea Pollution Performed in the Merchant Marine of the USSR Sergei M. Nunuparov, Black Sea Design and Construction Bureau, Odessa, USSR and Oleg N. Khalimonov, Ministry of Merchant Marine of the USSR, Moscow, USSR An Acoustical Method of Burning and Collecting Oil Spills on Cold Open Water Surfaces John N. Koblanski, Ocean Ecology, Ltd., Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada Testing of a Prototype Waste Oil Flaring System Robert L. Beach and William T. Lewis, Seaward International, Inc., Falls Church, Virginia Air Curtain Incinerator Tests Keith F. Kruk, Exxon Production Research Company, Houston, Texas An Effective Low-Cost Fireproof Boom K.M. Meikle, Environment Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada The Development and Testing of a Fireproof Boom Ian A. Buist, William M. Pistruzak, Stephen G. Potter and Nick Vanderkooy, Dome Petroleum, Ltd., Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Ian R. McAllister, McAllister Engineering, Ltd., North Vancouver, Canada 9:00 a.m. Mission Room A Session 8: Case Histories Chairman: Rear Admiral Sidney A. Wallace, USCG (Ret.), Washington, D.C. Vice Chairman: William Walker, U.S. Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C.

The Texaco Connecticut's Oil Spill Incident in the Panama Canal Cesar Von Chong, John C. Jordan, and Ricardo Gutierrez, Panama Canal Commission, Panama Funiwa No. 5 Oil Well Blowout — Interesting Issues Albert H. Lasday and Harold J. Weiss, Texaco, Inc., Beacon, New York Hasbah 6—Oil Companies Response to Oil Pollution in the Arabian Gulf P. Bernard Ryan, Gulf Area Oil Companies Mutual Aid Organization, Manama, Bahrain The Fate of Two Large Oil Spills in the Arabian Gulf William J. Lehr and Murat S. Belen, University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia The Hasbah 6 (Saudi Arabia) Blowout: The Effects of an International Oil Spill as Experienced in Qatar Joseph A.C.M. van Oudenhoven, Shell Internationale Petroleum Maatschappij, The Hague, Netherlands 9:00 a.m. Mission Room B Session 9: Environmental Mapping Chairman: Robert Landers, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C.

Vice Chairman: Edward Gilfillan, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine Method for Ranking Biological Resources in Oil Spill Response Planning J.K. Adams, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Slidell, Louisiana; A.J. Heikamp, Jr., LOOP, Inc., Harvey, Louisiana; R.P. Hannah, Louisiana Department of Natural Resorces, Baton Rouge, Louisiana Ecological Mapping and Cleanup of Oil Spills Onshore Terje Klokk, Arild Danielsen, Erling Sendstad and Per Tommeraas, SINTEF, Trondheim, Norway Characteristics of Resource Protection Plans: An Analysis of Methods Randall W. Smith, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Sacramento, California MIRG Environmental Element: An Oil Spill Response Planning Tool for the Gulf of Mexico June Lindstedt-Siva, Atlantic Richfield Company, Los Angeles, California; Bart J. Baca and Charles D. Getter, Research Planning Institute, Inc., Columbia, South Carolina Oil Spill Protection Planning for Natural Resources in Oregon G. Bruce Sutherland, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, Corvallis, Oregon; Irving W. Jones, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, Oregon; Randall W. Smith, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Sacramento, California 9:00 a.m. Fiesta Room Session 10: Experimental Studies of Coastal Zone Impacts Chairman: G.R.H. Fern, Imperial Oil Ltd., Toronto, Ontario, Canada Vice Chairman: Joseph P. Lafornara, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, New Jersey The Port Bolivar, Texas Oil Spill — A Case History of Oiled Bird Survival Allan J. Mueller and Carlos H. Mendoza, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Houston, Texas A Unique Oiled Bird Rehabilitation Operation — Myrtle Beach, S.C., February 1981 Donald P. Schultz and W. Waynon Johnson, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Atlanta, Georgia; Alice B. Berkner, International Bird Rescue Research Center, Berkeley, California Effects of Oil on Growth and Decomposition of Spartina Alterniflora Steve K. Alexander and James W. Webb, Jr., Texas A&M University, Galveston, Texas Preliminary Results of Laboratory Testing of Oil and Dispersants on Mangroves Charles D. Getter, Thomas G. Ballou and Jeffrey A. Dahlin, Research Planning Institute, Inc., Columbia, South Carolina 12:00 noon North Exhibit Hall No-Host Luncheon 2:00 p.m. River Room Session 11: Shoreline Cleanup Chairman: Lt. Commander James T. Paskewich, U.S. Coast Guard, Washington, D.C.

Vice Chairman: James Parker, Industrial Marine Service, Inc., Norfolk, Virginia Oil Spill on Northern Shorelines — An Evaluation of Some Options Dealing with This Problem Erling Sendstad and Per Sveum, SINTEF, Trondheim, Norway Shoreline Experiments and the Persistence of Oil on Arctic Beaches Edward H. Owens and John R. Harper, Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada; Carl R. Foget, Woodward-Clyde Consultants, San Francisoc, California; Wishart Robson, Petro- Canada Exploration, Inc., Calgary, Alberta, Canada Oil Degradation and Environmental Impact of Various Co-Disposal Methods Gerd Halmo, SINTEF, Trondheim, Norway Beach Cleaning Tests in the Netherlands at Hook of Holland Captain A. van Eden, North Sea Directorate, The Netherlands New Development in Beach Cleanup Techniques Richard Pasquet and Jacques Denis, CEDRE, Brest, France The Warren Spring Laboratory Beach Material Washing Plant for Shoreline Cleanup P.R. Morris, D. Tookey and T. Walsh, Warren Spring Laboratory, Stevenage, England 2:00 p.m. Mission Room A Session 12: Monitoring/Estimation of Oil Effects Chairman: Carl Eidam, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Lexington, Massachusetts Vice Chairman: Kenneth Meikle, Environment Canada, Quebec, Ontario, Canada Biological Monitoring of the Forties Oilfield (North Sea) J.P. Hartley, Oil Pollution Research Unit, Pembroke, England; J. Ferbrache, BP Petroleum Development (U.K.) Ltd., Aberdeen, Scotland Delineation of Subsurface Petroleum Spills Using Terrain Conductivity Measurements Wayne R. Saunders, Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Wayne, New Jersey; Robert W. Castle and Carl R. Foget, Woodward- Clyde Consultants, Walnut Creek, California Cape Fear River Oil Spill (North Caro- lina): Determining Oil Quantity from Marsh Surface Area Bart J. Baca, Jacqueline Michel and Timothy W. Kana, Research Planning Institute, Inc., Columbia, South Carolina; Nancy G. Maynard, President's Office of Science and Technology Policy, Washington, D.C.

Multivariate Analysis of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Weathering in the Subarctic Marine Environment James R. Payne, Bruce E. Kirstein, G. Daniel McNabb, Jr., James L. Lambach, Celso de Oliveira, Randolph E. Jordan and Wilson Horn, Science Applications, Inc., La Jolla, California Composition and Fate of Clean Ballast Water Discharged from Crude Oil Tankers Jerry M. Neff, Battelle New England Marine Research Laboratory, Duxbury, Massachusetts; James P. Marum, Mobil Oil Company, New York, New York; Scott Warner, Battelle Columbus Laboratories, Columbus, Ohio Exposure of Abarenicola pacifica to Oiled Sediment: Effects on Glycogen Content and Alterations in Sediment-Bound Hydrocarbons John M. Augenfeld, Jack W. Anderson, Steven L. Kiesser and Gilbert W. Fellingham, Battelle, Marine Research Laboratory, Sequim, Washington; Robert G. Riley and Berta L. Thomas, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, Washington 2:00 p.m. Mission Room B Session 13: Socio-Economic Legal Chairman: John Fitzpatrick, Gulf Oil Corp., Washington, D.C.

Vice Chairman: Ron DeNoville, Crawford and Company, Atlanta, Georgia The Cost of Oil Spills I.C. White and J.A. Nichols, the International Tanker Owners Pollution Federation Ltd., London, England Method for Conducting Oil Pollution Liability Insurance Survey Michael K. Breslin, Clean Environment Engineers, San Francisco, California The International Oil Pollution Compensation Fund Reinhard H. Ganten, International Oil Pollution Compensation Fund, London, England Multivariate Analysis of Worldwide Tanker Casualties Norman F. Meade and Thomas F. La- Pointe, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Washington, D.C.; Robert C. Anderson, American Petroleum Institute, Washington, D.C.

The Law and Practice of Assessing Damages to Natural Resources James S. Mattson, Mattson and Pave, Washington, D.C.; Allen van Emmerik, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.

Risk Control Management for Oil Spills Leo Kiebala, Crawford and Company, Atlanta, Georgia 2:00 p.m. Fiesta Room Session 14: Nearshore Dispersant Experiments Chairman: Clayton McAuliffe, Chevron Oil Field Research Co., La Habra, California Vice Chairman: Richard A. Griffiths, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, New Jersey The BIOS Project — An Update Peter J. Blackall and Gary A. Sergey, Environment Canada, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Effect of Spills of Dispersed and Non- Dispersed Oil on Intertidal Infaunal Community Structure Edward S. Gilfillan, David S. Page, S.A. Hanson, J.C. Foster, J.R. Hotham, D. Vallas and R.P. Gerber, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine; S.D. Pratt, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, Rhode Island Long Term Fate of Dispersed and Undispersed Crude Oil in Two Nearshore Test Spills David S. Page, Edward S. Gilfillan, J.C. Foster, J.R. Hotham, R.P. Gerber, D, Vallas, S.A. Hanson, E. Pendergast, S. Herbert and L. Gonzalez, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine The Use of Flow-Through Fluorometry for Tracking Dispersed Oil David Green, Blair Humphrey and Brian Flower, Seakem Oceanography, Ltd., Sidney, British Columbia, Canada Thursday, March 3 8:30 a.m. River Room Session 15: Natural Resource Damage Assessment (A Panel Discssion) Chairman: George Kinter, U.S. Department of Commerce, Washington, D.C. Vice Chairmen: Nancy Maynard, U.S. Department of Commerce, Washington, D.C.

Jack R. Gould, American Petroleum Institute," Washington, D.C.

Panel Members: Bruce Blanchard, U.S. Department of the Interior, Washington, D.C. Ian C. White, International Tanker Owners Pollution Federation, Ltd., London, England Eugene R. Fidell, LeBoeuf, Lamb, Leiby and MacRae, Washington, D.C.

Robert C. Anderson, American Petroleum Institute, Washington, D.C.

8:30 a.m. Mission Room A Session 16: Contingency Planning II Chairman: Windsor Williams, CALTEX Petroleum Corporation, Dallas, Texas Vice Chairman: Columbus Brown, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington, D.C.

Applying OHMSETT Data to Spill Contingency Plans H.W. Lichte and M. Borst, Mason and Hanger-Silas Mason Company, Inc., Leonardo, New Jersey Marine Industry Group (MIRG) Robert J. Meyers and Michael R. Bennett, Exxon Shipping Company, Houston, Texas Review of United Kingdom Contingency Planning and Resource Capability Rear Admiral Michael L. Stacey, Department of Trade, London, England Organizational Obstacles to Decision- Making During Oil Spills H.E. Mew, Jr., North Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Community Development, Raleigh, North Carolina; Ann Hayward Rooney-Char, College of William and Mary, Gloucester Point, Virginia; Captain James D. Webb, U.S. Coast Guard, Norfolk, Virginia Offshore Oil Spill Equipment Evolution in Southern California — A Systems Approach?

Commander Lindon A. Onstad, U.S. Coast Guard, Long Beach, Californi Oil Spill Preparedness in a Tropical Offshore Area Ging Tuang Tan, Sarawak, Shell Berhad, Malaysia ABSORB: A Three Year Update in Arctic Spill Response Sharon O. Hillman and Richard V. Shafer, Sohio Alaska Petroleum Company, Anchorage, Alaska 8:30 a.m. Mission Room B Session 17: Equipment II Chairman: John Gilbert, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, Ohio Vice Chairman: Keith F. Kruk, Exxon Production Research Company, Houston, Texas Self-Contained Oil Recovery System for Use in Protected Waters Steven Cohen, U.S. Coast Guard, Washington, D.C. and Stephen Dalton, Offshore Devices, Inc., Peabody, Massachusetts OHMSETT Tests of Truck-Mounted Vacuum Systems for Oil Spill Recovery Donald C. Gates, Kevin M. Corradino and William R. Senftner, Mason and Hanger-Silas Mason Company, Inc., Leonardo, New Jersey OHMSETT Pump Tests M. Borst, R.J. Cocherell and H.W. Lichte, Mason and Hanger-Silas Mason Company, Inc., Leonardo, New Jersey Research and Development in the Institute of Ocean Environmental Technology Atsuo Yazaki, Japan Foundation for Shipbuilding Advancement, Tokyo, Japan A Portable Instrument for Screening Spill and Source Oil Samples J. Richard Jadamec, Gerd A. Kleineberg, MST2 Duane A. Marble and MST3 Lisa A. Wargo, U.S. Coast Guard Research and Development Center, Groton, Connecticut Mobile Command and Communication Systems J.T. Leigh, Texaco, Inc., Beacon, New York and William C. Park, Mobil Oil Corp., New York, New York Enhanced Oil Biodegradation: A New Operational Tool to Control Oil Spills Bernard Tramier and Andre Sirvins, Societe Nationale, Elf Aquitaine (Production), France 12:00 noon North Banquet Hall Luncheon James H. Gillie Assistant to the Vice President of Public Affairs, Phillips 66 "Right On Instead of Rip Off" 2:00 p.m. River Room Session 18: Spill Detection and Risk Analysis Chairman: Charles W. Sieber, U.S. Coast Guard, Washington, D.C.

Vice Chairman: George Clouden, U.S. Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Alexandria, Virginia U.S. Coast Guard Progress in Oil Spill Surveillance Commander James R. White and Lt. Commander Richard E. Schmidt, U.S. Coast Guard, Washington, D.C. An Approach to Observing Oil at Sea Robert Pavia and D.L. Payton, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Seattle, Washington Second Generation Oil Spill and Maritime Surveillance Systems Now Operational in Sweden Lars Backlund and Lars Holmstrom, Swedish Space Corporation, Solna, Sweden A Reexamination of Occurrence Rates for Accidental Oil Spills on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf Kenneth J. Lanfear and David E. Amstutz, U.S. Department of the Interior, Washington, D.C.

Statistical Failure Mode Analysis of Submarine Pipeline Accidents William K. Olender, Technology and Management Systems, Inc., Burlington, Massachusetts 2:00 p.m. Mission Room A Session 19: Training Chairman: Peter Holmes, British Petroleum, London, England Vice Chairman: Andre Zownir, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, New Jersey Results of a Full Scale Surprise Test of Sun's Major Spill Response Plan Leon J. Kazmierczak, Sun Company, Inc., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and T.A. Crawford, Sun Refining and Marketing Company, Aston, Pennsylvania Oil Spill Response Training for Cooperatives and Individual Organizations Paul C. Deslauriers, Marine Consultants, Anchorage, Alaska Specialized Training Programs — Oil Spill Simulation Exercises in a Tank Truck Rollover Training Course Clyde B. Strong, The Texas A&M University System, College Station, Texas Innovative Training: Computer Assisted Learning C.H. Peabody and R.H. Goodman, Esso Resources Canada, Ltd., Calgary, Alberta, Canada The International Maritime Organization Training Program in Oil Spill Prevention, Control and Response for Developing Countries Terrence M. Hayes and Bin Okamura, International Maritime Organization, London, England 2:00 p.m. Mission Room B Session 20: Dispersants II Chairman: Richard T. Dewling, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, New York, New York Vice Chairman: John P. Bennington, Standard Oil Company (Indiana), Chicago, Illinois Operational Considerations for Optimum Deposition Efficiency in Aerial Application of Dispersants Gordon P. Lindblom, Exxon Chemical Company, Houston, Texas; Bryan S. Cashion, Exxon Research and Engineering Company, Florham Park, New Jersey Performance Evaluation of a New Versatile Oil Spill Dispersant Kenneth W. Becker and Gordon P. Lindblom, Exxon Chemical Company, Houston, Texas Effectiveness, Behavior and Toxicity of Dispersants Donald Mackay and Peter G. Wells, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

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